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Chin. Opt. Lett.
 Home  List of Issues    Issue 11 , Vol. 16 , 2018    10.3788/COL201816.111203


Review of Geostationary Interferometric Infrared Sounder
Jianwen Hua1, Zhanhu Wang1, Juan Duan1, Libing Li1, Chenjun Zhang1, Xiaowei Wu1, Qing Fan1, Ren Chen1, Xiaojie Sun1, Lianwei Zhao1, Qian Guo1, Lei Ding2, Liwei Sun3, Changpei Han3, Xiangyang Li4, Nili Wang4, Haimei Gong4, Xiaoning Hu5, Qingjun Liao5, Dingquan Liu6, Tianyan Yu6, Yinong Wu7, Enguang Liu7, and Zhijiang Zeng8
1 Center of Interferometer R&
D, [Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences], Shanghai 200082, China
2 [Key Laboratory of Infrared System Detection and Imaging Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences], Shanghai 2 00082 , China
3 Third Engineering Department, [Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences], Shanghai 200082, China
4 [Infrared Imaging Material and Device Laboratory, Chinese Academy of Sciences], Shanghai 200082, China
5 [Key Laboratory of Infrared Imaging Materials and Detectors, Chinese Academy of Sciences], Shanghai 200082, China
6 Department of Optical Coatings and Materials, [Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences], Shanghai 200082, China
7 Space Cryocooler System Laboratory, [Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences], Shanghai 200082, China
8 [State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences], Shanghai 20008 2, China

Chin. Opt. Lett., 2018, 16(11): pp.111203

DOI:10.3788/COL201816.111203
Topic:Instrumentation, measurement and metrology
Keywords(OCIS Code): 120.3180  120.4820  120.6200  300.6300  300.6340  

Abstract
To measure the global atmospheric three-dimensional distribution and change of temperature and humidity is one of the key areas in atmospheric remote sensing detection; it is also a new research and development direction in the field of meteorological satellite application. As a main element of China second generation of geostationary meteorological satellite Fengyun 4 (FY-4), which was launched on Dec. 11, 2016, the Geostationary Interferometric Infrared Sounder (GIIRS) is the first interferometric infrared sounder working on geostationary orbit internationally. It is used for vertical atmospheric sounding and gains atmospheric temperature, humidity, and disturbances. The combination of Fourier transform spectrometer technology and infrared detectors makes GIIRS have high spectral resolution and large coverage over spatial areas. With this kind of instrument, meteorological satellites can improve the capabilities for severe weather event monitoring and numerical weather prediction. Here a concise review of the GIIRS development project, including its history, missions and functions, technical design, key technologies, system integration, calibration and in-orbit operation status, etc., is presented.

Copyright: © 2003-2012 . This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

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Received:2018/7/4
Accepted:2018/9/29
Posted online:2018/11/1

Get Citation: Jianwen Hua, Zhanhu Wang, Juan Duan, Libing Li, Chenjun Zhang, Xiaowei Wu, Qing Fan, Ren Chen, Xiaojie Sun, Lianwei Zhao, Qian Guo, Lei Ding, Liwei Sun, Changpei Han, Xiangyang Li, Nili Wang, Haimei Gong, Xiaoning Hu, Qingjun Liao, Dingquan Liu, Tianyan Yu, Yinong Wu, Enguang Liu, and Zhijiang Zeng, "Review of Geostationary Interferometric Infrared Sounder," Chin. Opt. Lett. 16(11), 111203(2018)

Note: This work was supported by the China’s National Key Special Earth Observation and Navigation Project, Ministry of Science and Technology of China (MOST) (No. 2016YFB0500600). We particularly acknowledge that the high-level GIIRS program specifications were based on the GIFTS specifications.



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